shaw-alex

Guide: SD VS HD and what cables to use

Discussion created by shaw-alex on Jul 6, 2012
Latest reply on Jul 11, 2012 by zod

The difference between Standard VS. High Definition

When we look at a TV or computer screen we don’t normally think about how the images are created, but if you look close enough you will see the pictures are made up of tiny squares or dots called “Pixels”.
Understanding the difference between Standard Definition and High Definition is easier when you understand how these pixels work.

Here is a picture of Mario from the classic video game. You see that he is made up of tiny squares to create the image. The more pixels in the character, the more definition is available.
mario_pixels.jpg

Here is another example. The image on the left is standard definition, while the image on the right is HD. Look closely at the fur, the eyes, and even the colours.

sdVShd.jpg

 

Choosing the right cable

 

1.jpg

Other Names: Coax

Maximum Resolution: Standard Definition

Audio: Yes

Compatibility: All televisions will have a coaxial input.

Notes: These cables can sometimes be screwed on tightly and could require a wrench to loosen.

 

2.jpg

Other Names: Composite Cable, Audio/Video Cable

Maximum Resolution: Standard Definition

Audio: Yes

Compatibility: Most TV's will have RCA inputs.

Notes: The Yellow cable is for Video, the White is for Left Audio, and the Red is for Right Audio.

 

3.jpg

Other Names:  YPBPR

Maximum Resolution:  High Definition, 720p/1080p

Audio: No. Additional RCA cable required for audio.

Compatibility: Most TV’s and HD devices will have component inputs.

Notes: Any time you use component cables, you will need to use an additional cable for audio.

 

4.jpg

Other Names: Separate Video, Y/C

Maximum Resolution: Standard Definition

Audio: No. Additional RCA cable required for audio.

Compatibility: Many older TV’s will have an S-Video port. Rare on new TVs.

Notes: Not commonly used, but here just for reference

 

5.jpg

Other Names: High-Definition Multimedia Interface

Maximum Resolution: High Definition, 1080p
Audio: Yes.
Compatibility: Always found on newer TV's. Not found in TV's prior to 2003.

Notes: You can spend anywhere from $20 to $160 on these cables. Does the price make a difference? Discuss in the comments below.

 

 

6.jpg

Maximum Resolution: High Definition, 1080p

Audio: No.

Compatibility: Some older TV’s will have DVI. Replaced by HDMI due to lack of audio.

Notes: With this input you can use your TV as a computer monitor! Also just like S-Video and component, you will need to use a separate audio cable.

 

optical.jpg

Other Names: TOSlink Cable

Audio: Audio Only, no video

Compatibility: Many HD television sets will have Optical Audio input. Many users add Optical Cables to home stereo systems.

Notes:Optical Cable is a great way to have separate high quality audio signals.

 

Feel free to post questions below regarding anything technical about HD vs. SD or about what cables to use, and we would be happy to answer.

^Alex

 

Message was edited by: Alex L 7/9/2012 - Added Notes to cables and changed component maximum quality from 1080i to 1080p.
Message was edited by: Alex L 8/8/2012 - Added Optical Audio section and "alternate names"

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